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Audio How To

  
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Audio How To

 
SUBBYROLLER SUBBYROLLER
New User | Posts: 6 | Joined: 11/11
Posted: 11/05/11
08:11 AM

Recenty i just got into the custom truck world. with a largefamily but not much income bunch of the work is to my 99 Suburban is going to be on my own. especailly system. so my question is, Does anybody know when huilding a box for subs, how do you make the calculations and dimensions for  for best sound. any comments greatly appreciated. oh and whatr material to use too. thanks  

GTluvr GTluvr
User | Posts: 80 | Joined: 06/09
Posted: 11/06/11
01:40 AM

Hi Stubby. You've asked a loaded question. After nine years doing audio installs, I've learned that the size of the box is mostly subjective. The manufacturer of the speakers you use can offer some basic guidelines, but after that, it's a matter of personal taste. A big hollow box offers deep booming bass. Many use ports to allow more air to travel, giving a sound like a cave. I prefer a tight, punchy bass so I use sealed boxes. The bottom line is, what can you fit in your designated space? If the manufacturer suggests 3.5 cubic feet for the box displacement, but you've only got a foot and a half behind your seats, then you're forced to make some adjustments. In the end I've found that buying pre-made boxes at a flea market to be quick and easy for customers who were pains to deal with. They look good and if the guy was blindfolded, he'd never be able to tell the difference. I'm currently building a set of sub boxes for my S10, and space is at a premium, so I just threw out the suggestions and made the smallest boxes I can fit. I used the Kicker tight space subs and I'm curious as to how they'll sound, but in the end, I'm not going to be bringing them back, so it doesn't really matter. At the Home Depot they sell MDF ( Medium Density Fiberboard) in precut sizes so you don't have to wrestle with a 4 X 8 sheet to build boxes. MDF is sonically inert, so it doesn't have odd harmonics like many hardwoods do. The downside is that it is easily mashed and dented so it is important to cover it with something to keep it intact. Lots of specialty shops build custom enclosures by glueing wooden circles that the speakers will fit into and stretching fleece over them and then covering them with the polyester resin used in fiberglassing. This can be messy, so find a clean workspace to do this. You don't want sawdust and other contaminants to fall into the gel while it's drying. Afterwards, much sanding and bondo adding is also a part of the routine, so it can take longer than building a square or rectangular box. They loook really trick when they're done so it's a matter of what your comfort zone is. Good luck with what you choose, I can be e-mailed if you have any other questions.

GT  

SUBBYROLLER SUBBYROLLER
New User | Posts: 6 | Joined: 11/11
Posted: 11/06/11
01:03 PM

Cool, thanks for the reply, you basically just answered my question. and tha is cool, i didnt know about the sanding and bondo, i will try it, yes cuz even though my truck is big, i want to saveas much space as possible bc, well my kids. Again, thank and definitely  if i need asst i will email.  

maomao123 maomao123
New User | Posts: 2 | Joined: 11/11
Posted: 11/25/11
12:54 AM

Yeah,I also a new user,So I don't know how to answer your question, but I study from Gtluvr,thank you!  
http://www.crusher.so

GTluvr GTluvr
User | Posts: 80 | Joined: 06/09
Posted: 11/26/11
04:20 PM

If you ever watched the show " Unique Whips" on the Speed  Channel,  they spent a lot of time showing the fleece/form method of building speaker pods. It is time consuming for the average Joe, because they have to do each step for a one-time deal, the shop had all the equipment and forms so it was more cost effective for them to spend a day or two building one. I document all the steps I take on my own truck at my website
http://www.Imageevent.com/mtspacez/esstenn/
that might provide some additional help. The problem is that since I photograph and do the work, there are often steps that get overlooked because once I start building, I sometimes forget to take photos of the steps I covered. The downside of the complex forms is that  1) It requires the use of a lot of polyester resin.
2) It is very messy. 3)The fleece has to be reinforced with fiberglass matte if it is a big box. 4) Once it hardens, to get it smooth requires a lot of body filler and sanding. Then you still have to paint it, although that isn't such a big deal if you use aerosol cans as opposed to automotive urethanes. A good clear coat is also a plus, but not a necessity.  

SUBBYROLLER SUBBYROLLER
New User | Posts: 6 | Joined: 11/11
Posted: 12/06/11
12:58 PM

just checked out the S-10, it got lots of potential. right ihave all my equipment now, just need trying to make decsion on what type of box i want now thanks for the info.  

GTluvr GTluvr
User | Posts: 80 | Joined: 06/09
Posted: 12/31/11
09:35 AM

I don't know how your sound project is progressing, but it dawwned on me kind of late, that Youtube probably has a ton of how-to videos, so I checked them out and there are several that are very helpful. Just type in speaker box building and you'll have lots of videos to check out, If you've got spare time. I'm on the verge of being considered an "Old Fart" so techno stuff isn't my first stop when searching for info, but Youtube is a great place to see how lots of things are done. The guy who did the series of videos I watched, goes into lots of detail and points out the stuff you don't see on the TV shgows like "Pimp My Ride"
This way you know what you're getting into and can get all the necesssary things BEFORE you start. They make it look like the job was done in half an hour. I've been up to my elbows in projects when I suddenly discover that I'm missing something and have to clean up and go out and pick up a tool or material that I didn't have in advance, that can wreck your day!

GT